4 Comments

  1. I don’t know. There’s something a bit dubiously suspicious about the second one. Not only the change of tone, but writing style, address, etc. Seems off.

  2. Antonio

    Although the wrath and lack of gladness I found the second one quite poor in terms of writing and phrasing, appears to me to be another person rather than our lovely Anne,

    Best!
    Antonio

  3. Sunny Rowe

    I, too, think they are by two other persons. The first is filled with flowery rhetoric, but the second seems to stumble rather than glide. She certainly remains an enigma. I do agree with the conniving part, and possibly tongue-in-cheek, as she did most definitely have an ax to grind with the corrupt cardinal.

    Side not. Did you know Anne suffered from milk leg following the birth of Elizabeth? This would never appeal to Henry (think Ann of Cleeves) and would have added to the supposition that Anne practiced witch craft? (Already suggested because of the large mole on her neck, which she covered with her necklaces, and the extra finger tip on her hand, which is why she created the style of the long, flowing sleeves.)

    Overall, I don’t think Anne pursued Henry or queenship, but when it was offered she gladly jumped on board. Then she fought for her life, and the life of her daughter.

  4. Banditqueen

    There is no evidence that Anne Boleyn was believed to practice witchcraft or was suspected of it by Henry. Henry continued to have sex with Anne regularly just as soon as it was allowed by the church, which is why she was definitely pregnant again before the end of 1533. The extra finger nail or tip is a myth invented by Nicholas Sander in the 1580s.

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