6 Comments

  1. Tamra Monroe

    What an excellent article! I had thought she was only around 15 when she met the king which would have put her around 12 when men began molesting her. Either way it was disgusting and is a shame Henry did not champion her and silence her accusers rather than silence his queen. I have also read the letter to Culpeper was written in two distinctly different hand writings. Hiring Derham was indeed her 2nd biggest mistake. The first and biggest was trusting in her husband and his affections.

    • 20 days after. I’m sure he would have preferred to know, ya know, before hand, but well – he was wiling to give allowances for how long it took news to travel and give them 20 days to come forward after the deed was done. If they remained silent and later were discovered to have known and not reported the information, they would be executed as traitors.

  2. Sari Graham

    Katheryn Howard is one of those consorts who failed because she was in turn failed by those around her. As stated, her poor upbringing and lack of courtly education left her with little to nowhere to turn when it came time to deal with real issues. I believe that Katheryn did the best she could at the time, at least having a basic sense of right and wrong, with what little knowledge she had of court procedure.

    Katheryn Howard is the poster child for the failures of men being blamed on the woman. Being sexually abused by a teacher was her fault for taking lessons alone with him. Spending time with young men and giving affection to one we can assume she had intent on marrying is met with threats and more physical abuse. Being blackmailed by Culpeper into a sexual relationship in the end cost Katheryn not only the love, affection, and protection of the King as well as her family, but also her head.

    In my opinion, Katheryn Howard was a victim for most of her short life, and her documented kindnesses to Margaret Pole as well as Lady Elizabeth reflect this, as these women had all been victimized by their circumstances, which likely would not have fallen upon them had they been of a different gender. Granted, Culpeper and Dereham lost their lives as well, but not many who crossed King Henry VIII in such a way lived to talk about it.

    As far as the men in Katheryn Howard’s life were concerned, the only thing Katheryn did well was die quickly and quietly, which is truly the sad truth in her life.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

12 + 5 =